MAP-BASED ADAS STANDARDS AND SOLUTIONS:
ADASIS AND ELECTRONIC HORIZON
1. MAP-ENABLED ADAS: CONCEPT
Advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) seek to warn drivers of impending hazards or to
intervene on their behalf; avoid an accident or to undertake certain driving tasks. Clearly, ADAS
must have access to data concerning situations unfolding around the vehicle in order to exact the
correct maneuver or issue the appropriate warning. In general, this is provided by sensors
equipped on the vehicle, which can include monocular and stereoscopic cameras, radar,
ultrasonic, and IR cameras. There is, however, a growing trend for ADAS to rely on data input
from sources other than local sensors, with V2X communication being a popular example.
One data source that is becoming more available in consumer vehicles is the digital map, which,
to date, has almost exclusively been used to support infotainment features, particularly
navigation. However, the “feature creep” approach to autonomous driving (an approach assumed
by many OEMs) is giving greater emphasis to use cases for map data beyond infotainment
purposes. In fact, a number of ADAS features can be enabled / enhanced by the use of map
data, but, in general terms, the objective is to use digital map data to construct an ADAS horizon
or a detailed view of the road ahead and the current position of the vehicle.
2. ADASIS AND ERTICO
Until very recently, map databases have been made available in a number of consumer vehicles,
but access to these data was restricted to navigation applications. So that ADAS systems might
benefit from map data, an interface is required in order to exchange the necessary information.
Without a standardized specification, this would require a high degree of replicated work, with
each separate ADAS system requiring close cooperation between OEMs, ADAS suppliers,
navigation application suppliers, and map data vendors. Given the increasing number of ADAS
that coexist within a single vehicle, and the tendency of OEMs to integrate ADAS from a wide
variety of ADAS suppliers, the need for a standard interface specification is clear.