08 février 2018

Velodyne’s latest LIDAR lets driverless cars handle high-speed situations

Velodyne’s latest LIDAR lets driverless cars handle high-speed situations Self-driving cars from Alphabet’s Waymo are currently cruising the streets of suburban Arizona, navigating around with no human at the ready to take the wheel should something go wrong. It’s some of the most advanced testing we’ve seen so far, reaching what’s know as Level 4 autonomy. These cars can operate without any human input, but only under certain conditions and on certain roads. Velodyne, one of the leading manufacturers of laser sensor for... [Lire la suite]

19 janvier 2016

Velodyne LiDAR Pucks to Serve as 'Eyes' for NAVYA Driverless ARMA Shuttles

Initial Two-Vehicle Test Could Pave Way for Autonomous Mass Transit in SwitzerlandSwiss Public Transit Provider PostBus Acquires First Two Fully Autonomous Electric Vehicles, Equipped with Compact VLP-16 LiDAR Sensors credit photo Navya Velodyne LiDAR announced that, in the first deployment of fully autonomous production vehicles, driverless technology specialist NAVYA will implement Velodyne's real-time 16-channel 3D VLP-16 LiDAR Pucks as part of a two-year, two-vehicle test with Swiss public transport company PostBus Switzerland... [Lire la suite]
12 décembre 2014

Velodyne's Sensor cuts self-driving car costs

You can't buy one yet, but the autonomous vehicle just got a little cheaper. As long as Google Inc. has been testing its experimental self-driving car, the costliest bit of hardware has been its rotating roof-mounted turret, which uses a laser-based radar system called lidar to map the car's surroundings in three dimensions. These spinning sensors, supplied by Morgan Hill, Calif., technology firm Velodyne Inc., cost $30,000 to $85,000 -- cheap enough for automakers and suppliers to buy them for research but far too expensive for a... [Lire la suite]