ADAS AND AUTONOMOUS DRIVING TECHNOLOGY IN
TRUCKS AND COMMERCIAL VEHICLES
1. ADAS IN COMMERCIAL VEHICLES
1.1. Background
A wide variety of advanced driver assistance systems (ADASs) have enjoyed impressive growth
in consumer vehicles, progressing from being the preserve of luxury vehicles to being offered in
sub-US$500 packages by mass-market players such as Toyota. Simultaneously, the capacities of
these systems have expanded, with combined functions allowing the first glimpses at automation
in production vehicles.
At the same time, however, the market for commercial ADAS has remained surprisingly sluggish,
a trend made more curious by the strong case for ADAS in commercial vehicles. These vehicles
tend to be significantly larger and heavier than their consumer counterparts, with more
compromised visibility and greater annual mileage. The main exception to this trend is the
popularity of aftermarket camera systems that afford the driver a better view of his or her
surroundings. This can range from simply supplying a feed to a display in the cockpit, to more
sophisticated systems that employ machine vision algorithms to provide visual, auditory, and
haptic warnings to the driver in response to certain scenarios: an impending forward collision, for
example, or the presence of vulnerable road users. The low penetration of ADAS in commercial
vehicles can be largely explained by a combination of high ASPs and the sentiment among fleet
operators that their professional drivers should not be in need of driver assistance systems,
especially given the cost and weight that these systems add.