Groupement ADAS : Advanced Driver Assistance Systems

26 novembre 2020

The MILLA Group Selects the Leddar Pixell From LeddarTech for the MILLA POD Autonomous Shuttle

POD-Image-600x314

 

QUEBEC,November 25, 2020 — LeddarTech®, a global leader in Level 1-5 ADAS and AD sensing technology, is proud to have been selected by the MILLA Group as the supplier for their cocoon LiDAR sensor. The MILLA Group has selected the award-winning Leddar™ Pixell as the front-end LiDAR for their MILLA POD autonomous shuttle.

The Leddar Pixell is the most robust solid-state LiDAR on the market. This sensor provides a 180-degree horizontal field of view (FoV) and can offer 360-degree coverage of a vehicle when four modules are used. The Leddar Pixell offers best-in-class shock and vibration resistance meeting ISO 16750-3 requirements and complies with the SAE J1455 standard for heavy dust intrusion, positioning the Leddar Pixell for use in the industrial vehicle markets requiring robustness and durability. Also, the Leddar Pixell is IP67 certified and provides an MTBF of more than 148,000 hours, which is equivalent to ten times that of scanning solutions. The Leddar Pixell is ideal for shuttles, robotaxis, ADVs, and other off-road vehicles used in construction, agriculture, and mining applications.

Read More:https://leddartech.com/milla-group-selects-leddar-pixell-leddartech-milla-pod-autonomous-shuttle/

More about Milla Group:https://millagroup.fr/pages/about/

 


12 novembre 2020

Waymo’s driverless cars were involved in 18 accidents over 20 months

waymo self-driving i-pace

Waymo’s driverless cars have driven 6.1 million autonomous miles in Phoenix, Arizona, including 65,000 miles without a human behind the wheel from 2019 through the first nine months of 2020. That’s according to data from a new internal report Waymo published today that analyzed a portion of collisions involving the robo-taxi service Waymo One, which launched in 2018. In total, Waymo’s vehicles were involved in 18 accidents with a pedestrian, cyclist, driver, or other object and experienced 29 disengagements — times human drivers were forced to take control — that likely would have otherwise resulted in an accident.


Three independent studies in 2018 — by the Brookings Institution, the think tank HNTB, and the Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety (AHAS) — found that a majority of people aren’t convinced of driverless cars’ safety. And Partners for Automated Vehicle Education (PAVE) reports a majority of Americans don’t think the technology is “ready for prime time.” These concerns are not without reason. In March 2018, Uber suspended testing of its autonomous Volvo XC90 fleet after one of its cars struck and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Arizona. Separately, Tesla’s Autopilot driver-assistance system has been blamed for a number of fender benders, including one in which a Tesla Model S collided with a parked fire truck. Now the automaker’s Full Self Driving Beta program is raising new concerns.

 

Waymo's driverless cars were involved in 18 accidents over 20 months

Waymo's driverless cars have driven 6.1 million autonomous miles in Phoenix, Arizona, including 65,000 miles without a human behind the wheel from 2019 through the first nine months of 2020. That's according to data from a new internal report published today by Waymo, which analyzed a portion of collisions involving the robo-taxi service Waymo One that launched in 2018.

https://venturebeat.com

 

Autonomous Shuttles: IDTechEx Report Reveals The Future Of Last-Mile Mobility

The autonomous mobility industry is tackling part of the last-mile problem that many commuters encounter when using public transportation by replacing large, diesel buses with a fleet of electric, self-driving shuttle buses that transport small groups of people along defined and planned routes. Autonomous shuttles could be a key element that connects the public transportation systems to reduce private car ownership in the future. The autonomous shuttle total market size will be over $18 billion by 2040, according to IDTechEx’s report “Robot Shuttles and Autonomous Buses 2020-2040”.

Autonomous shuttles are upright, boxy, 8-20 person vehicles that are symmetrical so they never do a U-turn. Small footprint, all-round vision, large doors, quiet, zero-emission, they can go indoors and over piazzas and roads and are able to perform many different tasks even in one day. Primarily intended for intensive urban use, they are gated to never exceed a determined speed, typically in the range 50kmph – 60kmph.

Autonomous Shuttles: IDTechEx Report Reveals the Future of Last-Mile Mobility

The autonomous mobility industry is tackling part of the last-mile problem that many commuters encounter when using public transportation by replacing large, diesel buses with a fleet of electric, self-driving shuttle buses that transport small groups of people along defined and planned routes.

https://aithority.com

 

 

 

Posté par Thierry Bapin à 07:53 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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11 novembre 2020

When AV Software Meets Human Driver…

A key question about autonomous vehicle (AV) technology is whether an AV software driver can match the capabilities of human drivers — and if so, when will this happen?

The vast majority of human drivers are quite good — especially when they are focused on the driving tasks and have multiple years of driving experience. However, most drivers are not fully concentrating on the driving tasks part of the time. Or young drivers have not yet reached the skill levels to hand difficult driving events. And older drivers eventually lose some of their driving proficiency.

The result is an unacceptable level of car crashes across the world. Total road deaths per year has topped 1.35M according to United Nation statistics. U.S. road deaths have ranged between 35,000 and 40,000 in the last five years.

Another sobering data point is the total cost of all vehicle crashes in the U.S. The last detailed study by U.S. Department of Transportation was done for 2010 and released in a 2015 report. This report showed total crash costs in 2010 reached $242 billion, or 1.6% of GDP, or $784 per person. When quality-of-life valuations or total societal harm costs are included, total crash cost was $836 billion or equivalent to 5.5% of GDP. Societal harm costs include quality of life valuations from loss of life and severe injuries. The details of the cost calculations are documented in the linked report.

A major reason for developing autonomous vehicles is to lower the cost and impact of car crashes. Human driving errors are by far the leading cause of car crashes and accounts for over 90% of total crashes. The big question is whether the best AV software driver can lower the crash rate compared to human drivers — and if this happens — how long will it take?

This column will give some perspectives on how AV software drivers stack up against human drivers. The next table lists key driving issues and compares how AV software drivers measure up versus human drivers. Most of the issues relate to known problems that most drivers struggle with part of the time. A few AV software driver issues are also included.

It is important to remember that there is a large difference in driving skills among human drivers. There is also a large difference in how far the AV software driver development has come. I will use Waymo data when numbers are needed or estimating future trends.


read more :

When AV Software Meets Human Driver... - EE Times Asia

Article By : Egil Juliussen A key question about autonomous vehicle (AV) technology is whether an AV software driver can match the capabilities of human drivers - and if so, when will this happen? We know that developing a safe AV software driver is extremely challenging.

https://www.eetasia.com

 

Posté par Thierry Bapin à 07:41 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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10 novembre 2020

Automated cone-laying truck launched in Australia

Australian road-safety technology provider Arrowes has just launched its innovative new Automated Cone Truck (ACT), which will improve safety in workzones by reducing the time human operatives must spend in live lanes when marking out a work area.

Developed over the last three years at the company’s manufacturing facility at Brendale, Brisbane the ACT  uses proprietary mechatronics, to automatically deploy and retrieve cones from work sites with a single operator, removing two people from being exposed to the risks of live traffic and potentially saving lives.

“Road safety is very important to me and my department and as chair of Austroads, we have recently launched our guide to road workers safety,” says Neil Scales, director general Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland. “When road workers put cones out on the road and more importantly collect them at the end of the works, it is vital they are safe.  Arrowes’ new automated cone truck goes a long way to improving the safety of workers responsible for deploying cones across the Australia.

Automated cone-laying truck launched in Australia | Traffic Technology Today

Australian road-safety technology provider Arrowes has just launched its innovative new Automated Cone Truck (ACT), which will improve safety in workzones by reducing the time human operatives must spend in live lanes when marking out a work area.

https://www.traffictechnologytoday.com

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09 novembre 2020

Autonomous Vehicle Security Needs From A Hacker’s Perspective

One of the main challenges with securing autonomous vehicles is protecting its linked applications in jailbroken phones or laptops, Laurie says. If an attacker were to jailbreak their own phone, they could see the application code while it was running, which includes how it talks to the backend server. They could then retrieve the application’s hidden data, such as credentials, and take full control of the code, vehicle and connected infrastructure.

The vehicle itself can also be a prime target for attackers. Tools to launch refined attacks against embedded hardware and controller area network (CAN bus) systems are not difficult to find. Attackers could simply purchase or rent a vehicle, find its common flaws such as a backdoor in a module or network, and compromise every other vehicle in the same fleet.

Who is Responsible for Autonomous Vehicle Security? 

First-party automakers are not the only ones who should be prioritizing digital safety. Third-party suppliers can also be at risk of a compromise. Attackers could find and exploit a vulnerability in a manufacturer’s network. Even a flaw unrelated to the vehicle operations unit could allow them to pivot onto a supplier’s network, Laurie says.

That is why it is critical that the entire autonomous vehicle infrastructure — every server, network, device, application, vehicle and component  — must be protected. Just one poorly configured server on the manufacturer’s or supplier’s end can lead to an attacker breaking into the server, pivoting onto the backend network and gaining control of the connected application and therefore the vehicle. 

 

Autonomous Vehicle Security Needs From A Hacker's Perspective

With connected cars becoming more common, the industry has more standards and options when it comes to autonomous vehicle security. Adam Laurie, known in hacker circles as Major Malfunction, leads X-Force Red's automotive testing practice. He has seen firsthand how easy it can be to compromise an autonomous vehicle if strong security processes and controls are not in place.

https://securityintelligence.com

 

06 novembre 2020

Israeli startup C2A launches cyber solution securing vehicles' birth-to-earth lifecycle

 

With incredible developments on the hardware side, including advanced imaging technologies and more eco-friendly engine systems, there is one major obstacle that is keeping the leading automotive executives up at night. The vehicle cyber-security issue is becoming the main worry for the automotive industry.

Jerusalem-based startup C2A Security, a provider of automotive cyber-security solutions, announced the launch of its flagship cyber-security product, AutoSec. C2A’s technology meets the rapidly-evolving challenges of vehicle cyber-security with an open platform that empowers industry stakeholders to identify and mitigate cyber-attacks while maintaining visibility and risk management capabilities throughout the lifecycle of the vehicle. 

According to the company, AutoSec provides OEM and Tier 1 suppliers full spectrum cyber-security across all car models, in addition to covering the cyber-security needs for a vehicle’s full lifecycle. C2A developed a cyber-hub that enables streamlined management of each phase--risk assessment, planning, policy creation and enforcement--with just a few clicks.

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Israeli startup C2A launches cyber solution securing vehicles' birth-to-earth lifecycle

I don't need to tell you that the autonomous-vehicle future is coming. This, you already know. Though, it does feel that the manual driving liberation movement keeps getting pushed back. Obviously, it's no simple task for OEM and Tier 1 manufacturers to design and maintain vehicles that live up to the ever-evolving strictness of global autonomous standards and regulations.

https://www.geektime.com

 

 

05 novembre 2020

The culprits of consumers acting as beta testers for safety critical software

Last week Tesla sent out a beta software update called "Full Self-Driving" to a select group of customers. This release is expected to comprise of improvements to the company's Autopilot – and include advanced driver-assist features designed for local, non-highway streets. While this is a remarkable engineering feat and a courageous move, it is also a dangerous one. 

on October 21, the company released a beta software update to selected Tesla owners called Full Self Driving (FSD). The problem is the same as before: the name is misleading, as the vehicles can't drive themselves. A disclaimer on Tesla's website confirms this, saying that the Autopilot system doesn't make the vehicles autonomous, and drivers must still supervise it.

In 2020 Euro NCAP launched a comprehensive Assisted Driving (AD) grading system intending to inform consumers about the best AD systems currently available, and more importantly, highlighting their technological limitations. In the classification system, points are deducted for misleading names. This may be one of the reasons the Tesla Model 3 only finished in sixth place.

 

Gábor Pongrácz - Bravery or Foolishness?

Last week Tesla sent out a beta software update called "Full Self-Driving" to a select group of customers. This release is expected to comprise of improvements to the company's Autopilot - and include advanced driver-assist features designed for local, non-highway streets. While this is a remarkable engineering feat and a courageous move, it is also a dangerous one.

https://aimotive.com

 

04 novembre 2020

Airbiquity unveils OTAmatic Vehicle Configurator

Airbiquity

Airbiquity, a leading player in connected vehicle services, has announced the launch of its OTAmatic Vehicle Configurator.

The new product, according to the company, is a tool for defining and managing connected vehicle software. It gives auto manufacturers insight into the ‘exact hardware and software configurations within a vehicle.

Besides, it will also help them manage known combinations of electronic control units (ECUs) and software versions in vehicles, and meet government rules for type certified vehicle systems.

In the last few years, the number of vehicle ECUs getting software updates via over-the-air technology has been steadily increasing, making it difficult for automakers to handle software configurations across their vehicles.

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03 novembre 2020

An Automated parking to reduce stress at the airport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Automated parking to reduce stress at the airport: Bosch, Mercedes-Benz and the parking lot operator Apcoa want to introduce fully automated driverless parking at Stuttgart Airport in the future. To this end, the Automated Valet Parking (AVP) system co-developed by Bosch and Mercedes-Benz is to be ready for commercial operation. The new Mercedes-Benz S-Class is already ready to welcome it as the world's first series production vehicle to feature the technology required for the future infrastructure-based AVP. As an option, customers can purchase the appropriate pre-installation for what the company calls INTELLIGENT PARK PILOT, which makes the S-Class capable of receiving a smartphone order to get to a reserved parking space. "With the new S-Class, it's not only driving that's a luxury, but also parking," says Dr. Michael Hafner, Head of Automated Driving at Mercedes-Benz AG. The P6 parking lot at Stuttgart Airport will serve as the pilot for the planned commercial automated parking service. Here, the companies will test how the vehicle technology in the S-Class interacts with the intelligent infrastructure from Bosch and APCOA FLOW, the digital platform provided by parking lot operator Apcoa. This platform makes the entire parking process ticketless and cashless. "Apcoa, Bosch, Mercedes-Benz and Stuttgart Airport want to work together to make parking fully automatic," says Christoph Hartung, Member of the Executive Board of Connected Mobility Solutions at Bosch. In the airport parking lot, preparations are currently underway to begin testing the planned automated valet parking service. The aim of this test with new S-Class vehicles at Stuttgart Airport is to ensure that the interaction between the vehicle, the infrastructure technology and the parking lot operator runs smoothly and is optimized for the customer.