17 mai 2018

Automated Vehicles for Safety

Automated Vehicles for Safety   Overview The continuing evolution of automotive technology aims to deliver even greater safety benefits and Automated Driving Systems (ADS) that—one day—can handle the whole task of driving when we don’t want to or can’t do it ourselves. Fully automated cars and trucks that drive us, instead of us driving them, will become a reality. These self-driving vehicles ultimately will integrate onto U.S. roadways by progressing through six levels of driver assistance technology advancements... [Lire la suite]
Posté par NEXYAD à 00:00 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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08 janvier 2018

Collision-free, emission-free driving – no zero-sum game

Crash data reports make for sombre reading. The latest to be published by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) shows that 37,461 lives were lost on US roads in 2016, marking a 5.6% increase from 2015 and the second consecutive year of rising fatalities. In Europe, 25,670 people died in road traffic-related collisions according to statistics from the European Transport Safety Council. While this represents a 2% decrease compared to the previous year, it is still a long way from the target set by the European... [Lire la suite]
Posté par Baptiste_David à 12:36 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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31 octobre 2017

Would You Buy a Self-Driving Future From These Guys?

Crédit photo:Jan Buchczik   When the owner of an automated Tesla was killed in a crash last year, the carmaker’s founder, Elon Musk, urged journalists to peer into the future. “If, in writing some article that’s negative, you effectively dissuade people from using an autonomous vehicle,” Mr. Musk said, “you’re killing people.” Scary. But self-driving vehicle proponents like Mr. Musk envision a world where those cars would all but eliminate traffic accidents, unleash our productivity and allow the old and disabled to travel... [Lire la suite]
23 septembre 2017

Vehicle safety regulations and ADAS: tensions between law and technology

ADAS Safety Focus: Around View Systems Automobile safety has driven several key innovations over the years from anti-lock brakes to airbags. German automakers have been first to leverage many of the most advanced technologies to improve driver safety and the overall driving experience. For example, German vehicles were the first to offer active lane keeping assist, which introduces a vibration to the steering wheel when the driver veers from his lane. Then came side assist radar to help drivers safely change lanes. It alerts the... [Lire la suite]
10 juillet 2016

Autonomous driving levels 0 to 5: Understanding the differences

Autonomous driving levels 0 to 5: Understanding the differences Between the buzz over self-driving cars at CES 2016 and the Obama administration's announcement to invest almost $4 billion in autonomous vehicle research over the next 10 years, the race to create the best self-driving car has never been hotter. And, the rise of self-driving cars is going to have a major impact on businesses and professionals. Automated vehicles could replace corporate fleets for deliveries or transporting employees, for example.... [Lire la suite]
23 mai 2016

Autonomous driving levels 0 to 5: Understanding the differences

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration defined five different levels for self-driving cars, ranging from complete driver control to complete autonomy. Here's a primer. : Between the buzz over self-driving cars at CES 2016 and the Obama administration's announcement to invest almost $4 billion in autonomous vehicle research over the next 10 years, the race to create the best self-driving car has never been hotter. And, the rise of self-driving cars is going to have a major impact on businesses and... [Lire la suite]
12 mai 2016

Self-driving cars: The next revolution (by KPMG)

Self-driving cars: The next revolution (by KPMG) The Status Quo: The High Cost of Mobility The desire to go where we want whenever we want has been a powerful market force for centuries. And the automotive industry has been—and continues to be—a critical component of the U.S. economy, employing 1.7 million people (across manufacturers, suppliers, and dealers) and providing $500 billion in annual compensation, as well as accounting for approximately 3 percent of GDP.2 But mobility is increasingly expensive and inefficient. First, of... [Lire la suite]
23 février 2016

NHTSA rules that AI can be sole driver of Google’s self-driving cars

Highway Administration ruling means steering wheel, pedals not needed. credit photo Google   The US government has cleared the way for Google to create a self-driving car that doesn't also have a human driver inside the vehicle that can take over if necessary. In this setup, the autonomous driving software itself would be the vehicle's legal "driver"; none of the human passengers would require a driving licence. In November last year, Google submitted a proposed design to the US National Highway Traffic... [Lire la suite]
06 novembre 2014

The two cultures of robocars

The conservative view sees robocars as an automotive technology. For the aggressive school, this is a computer technology, and will be developed — and change the world — at the much faster pace that computer technologies do. The conservative and aggressive approaches to robocars will clash when it comes to deciding how to measure the safety of the products and how they should be regulated. Read more : http://robohub.org/the-two-cultures-of-robocars/ Le point de vue "conservateur" voit les robocars comme une technologie automobile.... [Lire la suite]
Posté par Thierry Bapin à 08:57 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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